Departmental Colloquium: Dr. Flavio Villanustre

When:
April 11, 2017 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
2017-04-11T14:00:00-04:00
2017-04-11T15:00:00-04:00
Where:
Department Conference Room (25 Park Place, Room 755)

Modern Big Data Pipelines with Dataflow Programming Models: The Open Source HPCC Systems Approach to Big Data Analytics

Dr. Flavio Villanustre
VP Technology
LexisNexis and HPCC Systems

Big data analytics can be a daunting field. The complexity of the analysis is usually compounded with the volume of data to impair the tractability of certain problems. The widespread explicit MapReduce programming model used by Hadoop and other big data platforms only makes things worse, burdening programmers with decomposing and translating algorithms into the Map, Shuffle/Distribute, and Reduce basic building blocks while representing data structures as simple key/value pairs. The approach that the open-source HPCC Systems platform takes to tackle this problem is novel and relies on an open dataflow programming language (ECL) equipped with all of the high-level data primitives that a programmer would need to implement high-level algorithms with little effort. ECL, a statically typed compiled language, combined with a distributed storage, workflow, and execution engine, provides a consistent and seamless environment for big data analytics. During this presentation, we’ll introduce the audience to the open-source HPCC Systems big data platform and its ECL programming language, and we’ll showcase different data analytics scenarios from the industry.

About the Speaker: Dr. Flavio Villanustre is VP Technology for LexisNexis and HPCC Systems. In this position, Flavio is responsible for developing the open-source developer and research community for the HPCC Systems big data platform, information security, and overall technology architecture. Prior to 2001, Dr. Villanustre served in different companies in a variety of roles in infrastructure, information security, and information technology. In addition, Dr. Villanustre has been involved with the open-source community for over 15 years through multiple initiatives. Some of these include founding the first Linux user group in Buenos Aires (BALUG) in 1994, releasing several pieces of software under different open-source licenses, and evangelizing open source to different audiences through conferences, training, and education. Prior to his technology career, Dr. Villanustre was a neurosurgeon.